Maro Publications

Transparent Materials

Notes

From 03/29/2014 to 5/16/2012

Maro Encyclopedia

Home

 

Transparent Materials: Patent Abstracts

Transparent Materials: Patent Titles

 

Materials

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Notes

1. “Translucent, meaning 'completely see-through'is used for most windows and glass doors. In the field of optics, transparency (also called pellucidity or diaphaneity) is the physical property of allowing light to pass through the material without being scattered. On a macroscopic scale (one where the dimensions investigated are much, much larger than the wavelength of the photons in question), the photons can be said to follow Snell's Law. Translucency (also called translucence or translucidity), is a super-set of transparency, allows light to pass through; but, does not necessarily (again, on the macroscopic scale) follow Snell's law; the photons can be scattered at either of the two interfaces where there is a change in index of refraction, or internally. In other words, a translucent medium allows the transport of light while a transparent medium not only allows the transport of light but allows for the image formation. The opposite property of translucency is opacity. Transparent materials appear clear, with the overall appearance of one color, or any combination leading up to a brilliant spectrum of every color. When light encounters a material, it can interact with it in several different ways. These interactions depend on the wavelength of the light and the nature of the material. Photons interact with an object by some combination of reflection, absorption and transmission. Some materials, such as plate glass and clean water, allow much of the light that falls on them to be transmitted, with little being reflected; such materials are called optically transparent. Many liquids and aqueous solutions are highly transparent. Absence of structural defects (voids, cracks, etc.) and molecular structure of most liquids are mostly responsible for excellent optical transmission.

Materials which do not allow the transmission of light are called opaque. Many such substances have a chemical composition which includes what are referred to as absorption centers. Many substances are selective in their absorption of white light frequencies. They absorb certain portions of the visible spectrum, while reflecting others. The frequencies of the spectrum which are not absorbed are either reflected back or transmitted for our physical observation. This is what gives rise to color. The attenuation of light of all frequencies and wavelengths is due to the combined mechanisms of absorption and scattering.”

(Wikipedia, Transparent Materials, 5/16/2012

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

In this day of overworked technical people, keeping up is nearly impossible.  Maro's mission is to help keep up in as little time as possible.  Bookmark this page and check it often.  You will be surprised what can be picked up in just a few moments spent each day.

These pages list the links as they are found.  Some will abstracted and added to Maro Topics. (RDC 2/7/2012)

 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Roger D. Corneliussen
Editor
www.maropolymeronline.com

Maro Polymer Links
Tel: 610 363 9920
Fax: 610 363 9921
E-Mail: cornelrd@bee.net  

***********************************

Copyright 2012 by Roger D. Corneliussen.
No part of this transmission is to be duplicated in any manner or forwarded by electronic mail without the express written permission of Roger D. Corneliussen
**************************************

* Date of latest addition; date of first entry is 5/16/2012.

Hit Counter