Maro Publications

Tissue Products

Notes

Patent Abstracts

Patent Titles

*11/14/2013 
from 7/29/2013

Maro Encyclopedia

Paper

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Patent Titles

11/5/2013      

4. 8,574,399 
Tissue products having a high degree of cross machine direction stretch 

10/29/2013      

3. 8,568,562 
Creping methods using pH-modified creping adhesive compositions 

2. 8,568,561 
Creped tissue sheets treated with an additive composition according to a pattern 

4/23/2013      

1. 8,426,031 
Soft tissue product comprising cotton 

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Notes

 “Tissue products, such as facial tissues, paper towels, bath tissues, napkins, and other similar products, are designed to include several important properties. For example, the products should have good bulk, a soft feel, and should have good strength. Unfortunately, however, when steps are taken to increase one property of the product, other characteristics of the product are often adversely affected.

To achieve the optimum product properties, tissue products are typically formed, at least in part, from pulps containing wood fibers and often a blend of hardwood and softwood fibers to achieve the desire properties. Typically when attempting to optimize softness, as is often the case with tissue products, the papermaker will select the fiber furnish based in part on the coarseness of wood fibers. Pulps having fibers with low coarseness are desirable because tissue paper made from fibers having a low coarseness can be made softer than similar tissue paper made from fibers having a high coarseness.

Fiber coarseness generally increases as fiber length and fiber surface area increase. Thus, the softness of tissue products can be improved by forming the tissue products from pulps comprising primarily short fibers, as they typically have a lower coarseness relative to long fibers. Unfortunately, tissue paper strength generally decreases as the average fiber length is reduced. Therefore, simply reducing the pulp average fiber length can result in an undesirable trade-off between product softness and product strength.

Tissue products having improved softness can also be formed from pulps comprising fibers from selected species of hardwood trees. Hardwood fibers are generally less coarse than softwood fibers. For example, those skilled in the art recognize that bleached kraft pulps made from eucalyptus contain fibers of relatively low coarseness and can be used to improve the perceived softness of tissue products. Unfortunately, because kraft pulps made from a single species such as eucalyptus are preferred by papermakers attempting to make soft, durable tissue products, they are in high demand and therefore more expensive than certain pulps which tend to comprise fibers generally having inferior coarseness properties. Examples include pulps which are derived by mechanical pulping regardless of the source species and recycled pulps which invariably contain a mixture of fiber types and species. Such blends are particularly prone to having relatively high coarseness compared to their average fiber length.”

[Tissue Products, US Patent 8,426,031 (4/23/2013)]

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Patent Abstracts

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Interested!!
Bookmark this page to follow future developments!.
(RDC 7/16/2012)

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Roger D. Corneliussen
Editor
www.maropolymeronline.com

Maro Polymer Links
Tel: 610 363 9920
Fax: 610 363 9921
E-Mail: cornelrd@bee.net  

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Copyright 2013 by Roger D. Corneliussen.
No part of this transmission is to be duplicated in any manner or forwarded by electronic mail without the express written permission of Roger D. Corneliussen
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* Date of latest addition; date of first entry is 7/29/2013.