Maro Publications

Stents

Notes

From 03/19/2014 
fto 5/12/2012

Maro Topics

Stents: Patent Abstracts

Stents: Patent Titles

Implants

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Notes

2. “In the technical vocabulary of medicine, a stent is a mesh 'tube' inserted into a natural passage/conduit in the body to prevent or counteract a disease-induced, localized flow constriction. The term may also refer to a tube used to temporarily hold such a natural conduit open to allow access for surgery.” (Stents, Wikipedia, 2/9/2013)

1. “This invention relates generally to implantable medical devices having a range of mechanical and therapeutic requirements during use. In particular, the invention relates to radially expandable endoprostheses that are adapted to be implanted in a bodily lumen. An "endoprosthesis" corresponds to an artificial device that is placed inside the body. A "lumen" refers to a cavity of a tubular organ such as a blood vessel. A stent is an example of such an endoprosthesis. Stents are generally cylindrically shaped devices which function to hold open and sometimes expand a segment of a blood vessel or other anatomical lumen such as urinary tracts and bile ducts. Stents are often used in the treatment of atherosclerotic stenosis in blood vessels. "Stenosis" refers to a narrowing or constriction of the diameter of a bodily passage or orifice. In such treatments, stents reinforce body vessels and prevent restenosis following angioplasty. "Restenosis" refers to the reoccurrence of stenosis in a blood vessel or heart valve after it has been subjected to angioplasty or valvuloplasty.”

“The treatment of a diseased site or lesion with a stent involves both delivery and deployment of the stent. "Delivery" refers to introducing and transporting the stent through a bodily lumen to the treatment site in a vessel. "Deployment" corresponds to the expanding of the stent within the lumen at the treatment site. Delivery and deployment of a stent are accomplished by positioning the stent at one end of a catheter, inserting the end of the catheter through the skin into a bodily lumen, advancing the catheter in the bodily lumen to a desired treatment location, expanding the stent at the treatment location, and removing the catheter from the lumen.”

“In the case of a balloon expandable stent, the stent is mounted about a balloon disposed on the catheter. Mounting the stent typically involves compressing or crimping the stent onto the balloon. The stent is then expanded by inflating the balloon. The balloon may then be deflated and the catheter withdrawn. In the case of a self-expanding stent, the stent may be secured to the catheter via a retractable sheath or a sock. When the stent is in a desired bodily location, the sheath may be, withdrawn allowing the stent to self-expand.”

“In many treatment applications, the presence of a stent in a body may be necessary for a limited period of time until its intended function of, for example, maintaining vascular patency and/or drug delivery is accomplished. Thus, stents are often fabricated from biodegradable, bioabsorbable, and/or bioerodable materials such that they completely erode only after the clinical need for them has ended.”

“A stent is typically composed of scaffolding that includes a pattern or network of interconnecting structural elements or struts. The scaffolding is designed to allow the stent to be radially expandable. The pattern is generally designed to maintain the longitudinal flexibility and radial rigidity required of the stent. Longitudinal flexibility facilitates delivery of the stent and radial rigidity is needed to hold open a bodily lumen. A medicated stent may be fabricated by coating the surface of either a metallic or polymeric scaffolding with a polymeric carrier that includes a bioactive agent. The polymeric scaffolding may also serve as a carrier of a bioactive agent.”

“A stent must be able to satisfy several mechanical requirements. First, the stent must be capable of withstanding the structural loads, namely radial compressive forces, imposed on the stent as it supports the walls of a vessel lumen. This requires a sufficient degree of strength and rigidity or stiffness. In addition to having adequate radial strength, the stent should be longitudinally flexible to allow it to be maneuvered through a tortuous vascular path and to enable it to conform to a deployment site that may not be linear or may be subject to flexure. The material from which the stent is constructed must allow the stent to undergo expansion which typically requires substantial deformation of portions of the stent. Once expanded, the stent must maintain its size and shape throughout its service life despite the various forces that may come to bear thereon, including the cyclic loading induced by the beating heart. Therefore, a stent must be capable of exhibiting relatively high toughness which corresponds to high strength and rigidity, as well as flexibility.”

“Unfortunately, many polymers used for stent scaffoldings and coatings are relatively brittle under physiological conditions, e.g., at body temperature. Many polymers remain relatively brittle, and hence susceptible to mechanical instability such as fracturing while in the body.”

[Gayle et al, US Patent 8,099,849 (1/24/2012)]

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Notes

2. “In the technical vocabulary of medicine, a stent is a mesh 'tube' inserted into a natural passage/conduit in the body to prevent or counteract a disease-induced, localized flow constriction. The term may also refer to a tube used to temporarily hold such a natural conduit open to allow access for surgery.” (Stents, Wikipedia, 2/9/2013)

1. “This invention relates generally to implantable medical devices having a range of mechanical and therapeutic requirements during use. In particular, the invention relates to radially expandable endoprostheses that are adapted to be implanted in a bodily lumen. An "endoprosthesis" corresponds to an artificial device that is placed inside the body. A "lumen" refers to a cavity of a tubular organ such as a blood vessel. A stent is an example of such an endoprosthesis. Stents are generally cylindrically shaped devices which function to hold open and sometimes expand a segment of a blood vessel or other anatomical lumen such as urinary tracts and bile ducts. Stents are often used in the treatment of atherosclerotic stenosis in blood vessels. "Stenosis" refers to a narrowing or constriction of the diameter of a bodily passage or orifice. In such treatments, stents reinforce body vessels and prevent restenosis following angioplasty. "Restenosis" refers to the reoccurrence of stenosis in a blood vessel or heart valve after it has been subjected to angioplasty or valvuloplasty.”

“The treatment of a diseased site or lesion with a stent involves both delivery and deployment of the stent. "Delivery" refers to introducing and transporting the stent through a bodily lumen to the treatment site in a vessel. "Deployment" corresponds to the expanding of the stent within the lumen at the treatment site. Delivery and deployment of a stent are accomplished by positioning the stent at one end of a catheter, inserting the end of the catheter through the skin into a bodily lumen, advancing the catheter in the bodily lumen to a desired treatment location, expanding the stent at the treatment location, and removing the catheter from the lumen.”

“In the case of a balloon expandable stent, the stent is mounted about a balloon disposed on the catheter. Mounting the stent typically involves compressing or crimping the stent onto the balloon. The stent is then expanded by inflating the balloon. The balloon may then be deflated and the catheter withdrawn. In the case of a self-expanding stent, the stent may be secured to the catheter via a retractable sheath or a sock. When the stent is in a desired bodily location, the sheath may be, withdrawn allowing the stent to self-expand.”

“In many treatment applications, the presence of a stent in a body may be necessary for a limited period of time until its intended function of, for example, maintaining vascular patency and/or drug delivery is accomplished. Thus, stents are often fabricated from biodegradable, bioabsorbable, and/or bioerodable materials such that they completely erode only after the clinical need for them has ended.”

“A stent is typically composed of scaffolding that includes a pattern or network of interconnecting structural elements or struts. The scaffolding is designed to allow the stent to be radially expandable. The pattern is generally designed to maintain the longitudinal flexibility and radial rigidity required of the stent. Longitudinal flexibility facilitates delivery of the stent and radial rigidity is needed to hold open a bodily lumen. A medicated stent may be fabricated by coating the surface of either a metallic or polymeric scaffolding with a polymeric carrier that includes a bioactive agent. The polymeric scaffolding may also serve as a carrier of a bioactive agent.”

“A stent must be able to satisfy several mechanical requirements. First, the stent must be capable of withstanding the structural loads, namely radial compressive forces, imposed on the stent as it supports the walls of a vessel lumen. This requires a sufficient degree of strength and rigidity or stiffness. In addition to having adequate radial strength, the stent should be longitudinally flexible to allow it to be maneuvered through a tortuous vascular path and to enable it to conform to a deployment site that may not be linear or may be subject to flexure. The material from which the stent is constructed must allow the stent to undergo expansion which typically requires substantial deformation of portions of the stent. Once expanded, the stent must maintain its size and shape throughout its service life despite the various forces that may come to bear thereon, including the cyclic loading induced by the beating heart. Therefore, a stent must be capable of exhibiting relatively high toughness which corresponds to high strength and rigidity, as well as flexibility.”

“Unfortunately, many polymers used for stent scaffoldings and coatings are relatively brittle under physiological conditions, e.g., at body temperature. Many polymers remain relatively brittle, and hence susceptible to mechanical instability such as fracturing while in the body.”

[Gayle et al, US Patent 8,099,849 (1/24/2012)]

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Copyright 2012 by Roger D. Corneliussen.
No part of this transmission is to be duplicated in any manner or forwarded by electronic mail without the express written permission of Roger D. Corneliussen
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* Date of latest addition; date of first entry is 5/14/2012.