Maro Publications

Lay-Up

Notes

*12/6/2012
from 4/24/2012

Maro Encyclopedia

Comments

Article Abstracts

Article Titles

Books.htm

Patent Abstracts

Patent Titles

Composite Fabrication

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Notes

2. “Hand lay-up is the simplest and oldest open molding method of the composite fabrication processes. It is a low volume, labor intensive method suited especially for large components, such as boat hulls. Glass or other reinforcing mat or woven fabric or roving is positioned manually in the open mold, and resin is poured, brushed, or sprayed over and into the glass plies. Entrapped air is removed manually with squeegees or rollers to complete the laminates structure. Room temperature curingpolyesters and epoxies are the most commonly used matrix resins. Curing is initiated by a catalyst in the resin system, which hardens the fiber reinforced resincomposite without external heat. For a high quality part surface, a pigmented gel coat is first applied to the mold surface.” (Engineer’s Handbook, Hand Lay-Up, 4/24/2012)

1. “Composite structures are typically constructed from multiple layers or plies. These plies may include a variety of materials such as carbon fiber, various other fibers, metal foils, and the like. In addition, the plies may be pre-impregnated with a resin and are often dispensed from a roll or spool. Typically, multiple plies are applied, one upon another, sometimes in multiple directions, to generate a "layup" of the composite item. This layup or "preform" is generally built up within a mold or over a form. Often, the plies are slightly oversized to ease the layup process. Depending upon the materials utilized and post-layup procedures that may be performed, any excess composite material is cut from the layup before or after the layup is cured. [Evans and Heigl, US Patent 8,132,487 (3/13/2012)]

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

In this day of overworked technical people, keeping up is nearly impossible.  Maro's mission is to help keep up in as little time as possible.  Bookmark this page and check it often.  You will be surprised what can be picked up in just a few moments spent each day.

These pages list the links as they are found.  Some will abstracted and added to Maro Topics. (RDC 2/7/2012)

 xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Roger D. Corneliussen
Editor
www.maropolymeronline.com

Maro Polymer Links
Tel: 610 363 9920
Fax: 610 363 9921
E-Mail: cornelrd@bee.net  

***********************************

Copyright 2012 by Roger D. Corneliussen.
No part of this transmission is to be duplicated in any manner or forwarded by electronic mail without the express written permission of Roger D. Corneliussen
**************************************

* Date of latest addition; date of first entry is 4/24/2012.

Hit Counter