Maro Publications

Emulsions

Notes

Patent Abstracts

Patent Titles

*11/26/2013 
from 11/7/2013

Maro Encyclopedia

Liquids

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Patent Titles

11/12/2013

8. 8,580,875 
Acrylic emulsion polymers for removable pressure sensitive adhesive applications 

11/5/2013

7. 8,575,266 
Preparing silicone emulsions 

6. 8,574,808 
Resin emulsion 

10/29/2013

5. 8,569,218 
Cleaning composition containing polymer microemulsion 

10/22/2013

4. 8,563,627 
Self emulsifying granules and process for the preparation of emulsions therefrom 

9/17/2013

3. 8,536,296 
Emulsions of high viscosity silicone polyethers 

2. 8,536,255 
Stable emulsions for producing polymer modified asphalt 

1. 8,535,802 
Continuous emulsification method and emulsification apparatus therefor 

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Patent Abstracts

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Notes

“An emulsion is a mixture of two or more liquids that are normally immiscible (nonmixable or unblendable). Emulsions are part of a more general class of two-phase systems of matter called colloids. Although the terms colloid and emulsion are sometimes used interchangeably, emulsion should be used when both the dispersed and the continuous phase are liquids. In an emulsion, one liquid (the dispersed phase) is dispersed in the other (the continuous phase). Examples of emulsions include vinaigrettes, milk, mayonnaise, and some cutting fluids for metal working. The photo-sensitive side of photographic film is an example of a colloid.

The word "emulsion" comes from the Latin word for "to milk", as milk is an emulsion of milk fat and water, among other components.

Two liquids can form different types of emulsions. As an example, oil and water can form, firstly, an oil-in-water emulsion, where the oil is the dispersed phase, and water is the dispersion medium. Secondly, they can form a water-in-oil emulsion, where water is the dispersed phase and oil is the external phase. Multiple emulsions are also possible, including a "water-in-oil-in-water" emulsion and an "oil-in-water-in-oil" emulsion.

Emulsions, being liquids, do not exhibit a static internal structure. The droplets dispersed in the liquid matrix (called the “dispersion medium”) are usually assumed to be statistically distributed.

(Emulsions, Wikipedia, 11/7/2013)

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx