Maro Publications

Diamond-Like Coatings (DLC)

Notes

Patent Abstracts

Patent Titles

*11/26/2013 
from 7/30/2013

Maro Encyclopedia

Carbon

Coatings

Coatings

Diamonds

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Patent Titles

11/12/2013   

9. 8,580,336 
Method of making heat treated coated article using diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating and protective film 

9/3/2013   

8. 8,523,966 
Method for applying a powdered-diamond coating to the surface of cutters for dentistry excluding slot surfaces 

8/20/2013     

7. 8,512,864 
Component for rotary machine 

8/6/2013   

6. 8,501,673 
DLC-coated member 

7/30/2013   

5. 8,496,992 
Methods of forming nanocomposites containing nanodiamond particles by vapor deposition 

6/4/2013   

4. 8,455,060 
Method for depositing hydrogenated diamond-like carbon films using a gas cluster ion beam

5/21/2013 

3. 8,443,627 
Method of making heat treated coated article using diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating and protective film

5/14/2013 

2. 8,440,255  Method of making heat treated coated article using diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating and protective film 

4/23/2013

1. 8,426,024 
Diamond like carbon coating of substrate housings 

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Notes

2. “Diamond may be considered to be a very unique material. It has relatively high hardness, high thermal conductivity, high electric resistivity, a low coefficient of friction and is substantially inert to attacks from most chemicals. For tribological applications, diamond may be considered an excellent material to inhibit erosion, abrasion and sliding wear.

Natural diamond may be considered too expensive and too small in size to protect industrial component surfaces. Similarly, synthetic diamond, which may be used in polishing, grinding and cutting, particularly in machining, mining or oil/natural gas exploration applications, may be difficult to use as a protective coating on components to inhibit erosion, abrasion, wear and corrosion.

It may be possible to form diamond coatings on larger surface areas using a few methods including hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) and microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD). However, such are understood to require high temperature and a limited range of substrate materials. For example, diamond may be deposited on tungsten carbide (WC) for cutting applications. However, due to crystallinity, the coating surface may be quite rough. Consequently, with the exception of cutting applications, diamond coatings may be understood to rarely be used on substrates comprising, for example, steel, titanium (Ti) alloys and aluminum (Al) alloys, as well as substrates for tribological applications.

A coating which may be used as an alternative to diamond is a coating of diamond-like carbon (DLC). A diamond-like carbon coating may be understood herein to be a carbon coating with the amorphous structure, generally containing a high concentration of hydrogen. DLC coatings may be understood to have reasonable hardness, good wear resistance, a relatively low coefficient of friction and are chemically inert. Unlike diamond coatings, however, DLC coatings may be deposited on substrates including steel, titanium (Ti) alloys and aluminum (Al) alloys using a bonding layer, typically of silicon (Si) or silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon may be understood to bond with DLC due to a formation of a thin layer of silicon carbide at the interface between the silicon and DLC.

However, DLC coatings are understood to be useful only to about 400.degree. C., above which temperature graphitization of the carbon may occur. Furthermore, DLC coatings may be understood to be relatively brittle or of low toughness. As a result, DLC coatings are commonly used for low stress sliding wear applications, but not for severe environments including erosion or abrasion under high stress or heavy load. “

[Diamond-Like Coatings, US Patent 8,496,992 (7/30/2013)]

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1. “Diamond-like carbon (DLC) exists in seven different forms[1] of amorphous carbon materials that display some of the typical properties of diamond. They are usually applied as coatings to other materials that could benefit from some of those properties. All seven contain significant amounts of sp3 hybridized carbon atoms. The reason that there are different types is that even diamond can be found in two crystalline polytypes. The usual one has its carbon atoms arranged in a cubic lattice, while the very rare one (lonsdaleite) has a hexagonal lattice. By mixing these polytypes in various ways at the nanoscale level of structure, DLC coatings can be made that at the same time are amorphous, flexible, and yet purely sp3 bonded "diamond". The hardest, strongest, and slickest is such a mixture, known as tetrahedral amorphous carbon, or ta-C. For example, a coating of only 2 μm thickness of ta-C increases the resistance of common (i.e. type 304) stainless steel against abrasive wear; changing its lifetime in such service from one week to 85 years. Such ta-C can be considered to be the "pure" form of DLC, since it consists only of sp3 bonded carbon atoms. Fillers such as hydrogen, graphitic sp2 carbon, and metals are used in the other 6 forms to reduce production expenses or to impart other desirable properties.[2][3] The various forms of DLC can be applied to almost any material that is compatible with a vacuum environment. In 2006, the market for outsourced DLC coatings was estimated as about 30,000,000 € in the European Union. In October 2011, Science Daily reported that researchers at Stanford University have created a super-hard amorphous diamond under conditions of ultrahigh pressure, which lacks the crystalline structure of diamond but has the light weight characteristic of carbon.”  (Diamond-like Carbon, Wikipedia, 7/302013)

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Patent Abstracts

1. 8,496,992 
Methods of forming nanocomposites containing nanodiamond particles by vapor deposition 

Diamond may be considered to be a very unique material. It has relatively high hardness, high thermal conductivity, high electric resistivity, a low coefficient of friction and is substantially inert to attacks from most chemicals. For tribological applications, diamond may be considered an excellent material to inhibit erosion, abrasion and sliding wear. Natural diamond may be considered too expensive and too small in size to protect industrial component surfaces. Similarly, synthetic diamond, which may be used in polishing, grinding and cutting, particularly in machining, mining or oil/natural gas exploration applications, may be difficult to use as a protective coating on components to inhibit erosion, abrasion, wear and corrosion.

Wei, Rincon and Coulter of  Southwest Research Institute, Texas, coated  a substrate with a formulation containing nanodiamond powder. This suspension is subject to a plasma forming discharge with the discharge bombarding a target surface.  The result is a tough coating containing 1 to 100 nm diamond particles,  (RDC 8/5/2013)

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Interested!!
Bookmark this page to follow future developments!.
(RDC 7/16/2012)

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Roger D. Corneliussen
Editor
www.maropolymeronline.com

Maro Polymer Links
Tel: 610 363 9920
Fax: 610 363 9921
E-Mail: cornelrd@bee.net  

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Copyright 2013 by Roger D. Corneliussen.
No part of this transmission is to be duplicated in any manner or forwarded by electronic mail without the express written permission of Roger D. Corneliussen
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* Date of latest addition; date of first entry is 7/30/2013.